Thoughts, thoughts, thoughts

Thoughts, thoughts, thoughts.

I’ve been thinking a lot about them lately.

In fact, just this week alone, there have been at least a million questions Usain Bolting through my mind all hoping to win the race of demystifying thoughts.

Thoughts, thoughts, thoughts.

Where do they come from? And where do they go?
How do they affect me?
Why do I think? And is it even possible to stop thinking?

These are just some of the curious questions that have been wandering around in my mind, wondering if they will find the food which will satiate their hunger for answers.

Thoughts have always fascinated me, right from the moment I thought my first thought–I wonder what it was–to right now whilst writing to put my thoughts on digital paper.

In my quest to find answers, I’ve come across a few sources which claim that thoughts come from nowhere, yet also from everywhere. This may seem paradoxically contradictory, but it must be true considering that life itself is paradoxical.

If you think about it, you’ll realize that like something out of thin air thoughts just pop into our heads. We only detect them once they are already comfortable, at home in our heads. So subjectively speaking, where they come from is a complete mystery to us.

Objectively, according to cognitive psychologists, thoughts arise in the brain, when it takes in information through the senses. In this sense, thoughts come from everywhere, because our brain is constantly taking in information from our surroundings. This explains why seeing something can spark thoughts which either illuminate the dark, or add to its intensity.

It’s interesting to note that whether we know not where thoughts come from–nowhere or everywhere?–we still have the power to summon or banish them from our heads using our attention.

Thoughts, as we well know are a powerful force since they can seduce our emotions–which are what allows us to enjoy the beauty of life–into feeling a certain type of way.

If you don’t believe me puase for a few minutes and think of the last time you really enjoyed yourself.

How does doing this change how you feel?

Unless you are in a gloomy and perpetual state of chronic depression, you would’ve noticed that thinking about pleasant memories inspires your feelings to be pleasant in the present.
The opposite is also true, however, that reliving unpleasant memories results in you stirring up negative emotions in the pot of your psyche.

So as you can see–or feel–thoughts have an unbreakable relationship with our emotions. Therefore, as people always chasing after happiness, thoughts are actually our best friends–or our worst enemies.

Thoughts, thoughts, thoughts.

What type of relationship do you have with your thoughts?

Are they your enemy, invading the space within your face and conquering your sense of well-being?

Or are they your friend, entering your mind and inspiring your emotions to vibrate at the frequency of positivity?